Cryptocurrency mining will celebrate its 10th year of existence in 2019. It's certainly no fad, but it's also far from being a popular practice. The very concept of mining with high-end computer hardware is starting to trickle into mainstream consciousness, though. If anything, the evidence is in the scarcity of Nvidia and AMD graphics cards and the inflated pricing that has washed through retailers worldwide. The pricing has caught the attention of PC gamers, leaving them puzzled and asking why it's happening.

Xcoins describes itself as a Bitcoin lending service that allows traders to get bitcoins by using a credit card or PayPal. Due to charge back with paypal, buying cryptocurrency has been difficult however Xcoins claims to have found a way around it. Their unique peer-to-peer lending model connects lenders and borrowers and allows users to get bitcoins through a series of secure loans. Each secure loan can be paid with any PayPal-recognised payment method. Unlike regular cryptocurrency exchanges, borrowers that no longer want the bitcoin can get their money back. Lenders may also choose to join the platform for free.
The above list shows that, fundamentally, yes, anyone can mine cryptocurrencies; however, you must have a keen interest in mining, as well as an appetite to constantly learn and keep up to date on any technology changes. You also have to have the initial budget to be able to set up everything that is required. So, although, technically anyone can mine, realistically, it is not suited to everyone.
Mining Ethereum can be done in a variety of ways - you can buy a cloud contract and get someone else to do all the hard work for you, or you can do it yourself and get your GPU, or Graphics Card, up and running. However the efficiency of your graphics card can vary a lot and picking one can be quite difficult. What we have done is make the process easier for you by picking a handful of suppliers and showing you how to choose which GPU mines the most and which GPU is the best value for money.

Bitcoin solves the so called ‘’double spending problem’’ present with digital goods. For example, if I have an mp3 file or an ebook on my computer, I can freely copy that file a thousand times and send it to a thousand different people. For a digital currency, the possibility for unlimited copying would mean a quick hyperinflationary death. Bitcoin solves this by maintaining a peer to peer network and recording each transaction in a public ledger called the block chain. Say I send 1 bitcoin from my bitcoin address to my friend John. The bitcoin network records that transaction in the block chain and I no longer have possession of that bitcoin. The coin ‘’moved’’ from my bitcoin wallet to John’s wallet.
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